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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 119 (some duplicates have been removed)
" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, everyone. a state of emergency in japan tonight. officials are still trying to assess the scope of the damage and casualties from that massive earthquake. susie, the magnitude of the quake 8.9 is the strongest on record in japan. >> susie: tom, it's still not clear what the devastating earthquake will do to japan's fragile economy and the global markets. here in the u.s. despite the japan's stock index tumbled almost 180 points closing just minutes after the earthquake hit. >> tom: we spoke with our correspondent in tokyo. and began by asking lucy craft what's the initial assessment of damage to businesses and industry in japan. >> companies hit quite hard. sony, hond on, toyota, the major auto makers have a lot of factories up in northeastern japan. there's been a range of damage to these companies. so those factories will be kind of knocked out of operat
. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening, everyone. the world's largest bond fund is betting against bonds. pimco's total return fund has sold off its government bond holdings to zero as of the end of february. tom, this is a strong signal from pimco's flagship fund that it sees little value in owning u.s. treasuries. >> tom: susie, as a result of those bond sales, pimco is sitting on $54 billion of cash. the fund still owns other kinds of bonds. it's holdings are diversified among mortgage bonds, corporate debt, foreign bonds and municipal securities. >> susie: so what's the reason behind the bond fire sale? joining us now: william gross, the founder and co-chief investment officer of pimco. hi, bill, nice to have you here with you. >> hello, susie, thank you very much. >> susie: so your pimco return fund has had great returns up so far this year, it was up 8% last year. tell us why are you selling tr
" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: xp this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. president obama put libya on notice today saying the u.s. and its allies are ready for military action. tom, the president's message was aimed at libyan leader moammar qaddafi. >> tom: susie, speaking at the white house, president obama said qaddafi must end the violence and pull back troops from towns under attack. >> let me be clear, these terms are not negotiable. if qaddafi does not comply, the resolution will be enforced through military action. >> susie: ahead of the president's warning, libya said it's ceasing all military action and will begin talking with opposition groups. that came after a vote at the united nations calling for a no- fly zone over the country. not surprisingly, oil markets were volatile today. crude prices closed down 35 cents to settle at $101 a barrel, off their high of $103. as suzanne pratt reports the oil market
"nightly business report" for tuesday, march 15. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off. japan is on high alert tonight as the country responds to yet another explosion at the daichi nuclear power plant. japan's prime minister warned of substantial radiation leaks. the ongoing threat of radioactive fallout led to a global market sell-off today. we have complete coverage, beginning in tokyo with correspondent lucy craft. when i talked with her a short while ago, i began by asking what is the japanese government telling people. >> what we are hearing is there is the continuing troubles at the reactors. there are a total of six reactors at this power plant. and four of them have been having malfunctions at various times. there have been explosions, hydrogen explosions, and there was a fire at the number four reactor yest
" for tuesday, march 8. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. jury selection began today in the biggest insider trading case in a decade. on trial is raj rajaratnam, the billionaire investor and cofounder of the galleon hedge fund. tom, he's accused of making $45 million through illegal stock tips. >> tom: susie, prosecutors allege rajaratnam and 25 others swapped confidential corporate secrets on many well known companies, including google, ibm, ebay, intel, and goldman sachs. >> susie: our cameras were rolling when rajaratnam pulled up to the courthouse early this morning. from the moment he arrived, raj rajaratnam was in the spotlight. >> are you going to testify in your defense? >> susie: federal prosecutors allege rajaratnam used inside information to trade 35 stocks. the feds plan to use 173 wiretapped conversations and testimony from confidential in
17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska or u.s. territories in the pas civic. >> susie: besides japan's nuclear crisis a big spike in the japanese yen is creating a currency crisis. finance ministers from around the world are holding an emergency conference call tonight to figure out how to bring down the value of the yen. it's been surging in the aftermath of japan's massive earthquake. the yen is howevering
"nightly business report" for monday, march 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off tonight. it's day four of japan's monstrous earthquake and tsunami, and the full brunt of the damage is still unknown. the death toll is expected to exceed 10,000 and the country continues to battle the threat of a catastrophic nuclear accident. now japan is focused on the enormous human suffering, but attention around the world is also shifting to the economic consequences of the disaster. many economists believe the country is likely to slide into recession. so what will that mean for the rest of the world? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: there's no question the human toll of japan's epic earthquake and tsunami is incalculable. after all, how can anyone possibly put a price tag on the tragic loss of thousands of liv
" for wednesday, march 23. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. new signs today the u.s. housing market still is struggling. susie, that's even as many parts of the economy are recovering. >> susie: tom, what got everyone concerned is the latest new home sales numbers. they fell to a record low. sales tumbled almost 17% in february. even lower prices couldn't bring in the buyers. the average selling price for a new home fell to $202,000. at the current sales pace, it would take almost nine months to sell all the new homes on the market. >> tom: this discouraging news comes right at the start of the spring selling season. erika miller reports. >> reporter: instead of eating during her lunch hour, angie moncada likes to go house hunting online. she and her husband have been waiting for spring to get serious about their search. >> we want to move somewhere a
, march 3. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. the bulls ran wild on wall street today, with stocks surging across the board. tom, two words tell the story behind the rally-- "oil" and "jobs". oil prices fell slightly, and jobless claims were also down, a sign that the job market might be getting better. >> tom: susie, the major stock averages rose by 1.5% or more, and rallied all day, right from the opening bell. the dow jumped 191 points, the nasdaq added 50, and the s&p 500 was up 22.5. investors viewed those filings for unemployment benefits as a big positive. initial claims totaled 368,000 last week, down 20,000 from the week before, and the lowest weekly number in about three years. >> susie: we'll get more data tomorrow on the job market with the release of the february employment report. economists expect american businesses added about 200
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 119 (some duplicates have been removed)

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